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Michele Laliberte

Bio

Dr. Laliberté received her Ph.D. in 1994 from Queen's University, and completed her internship at Hotel Dieu Hospital in Kingston, Ontario. Dr. Laliberté is currently the Director of the Eating Disorders Program St. Joseph’s Healthcare and Staff Psychologist specializing in Eating Disorders. Dr Laliberté also has extensive experience in treating anxiety and depression. Her current research, in collaboration with Dr. Ayra Sharma (Professor of Medicine, Canada Research Chair for Cardiovascular Obesity Research and Management), examines the role of beliefs regarding control over weight on disordered eating in obese and non-obese populations. She is also extending previous research she has published on family factors related to disordered eating, as well as collaborating on other studies related to eating disorders. Dr. Laliberté has developed a group treatment manual for eating disorders, currently used in this program and others across Ontario.

Featured Publications

Laliberte, M., McCabe, R.E., & Taylor, V.H. (2009). The Cognitive Behavioral Workbook for Weight Management: A Step-by-Step Program. New Harbinger Publications .

Laliberte, M., Newton, M., McCabe, R., & Mills, J.S. (2007). Controlling your weight versus controlling your lifestyle: How beliefs about weight control affect risk for disordered eating, body dissatisfaction and self-esteem. Cognitive Therapy Research., 31, 853-869.

Laliberte, M., Mills, J., Newton, M., & McCabe, R. (2004). Perceived control over weight versus perceived control over lifestyle: Their relationship to disturbed eating and self-esteem. (abstract) International Journal of Eating Disorders, 35(4), 450.

Miller, J.L, Schmidt, L.A., Vaillancourt, T., McDougall, P., & Laliberte, M. (2006). Neuroticism and introversion: A risky combination for disordered eating among a non-clinical sample of undergraduate women. Eating Behaviors, 7(1), 69 – 78.

Laliberté, M., Mills, J., Newton, M., & McCabe, R. (2004). Perceived control over weight versus perceived control over lifestyle: Their relationship to disturbed eating and self-esteem (abstract). International Journal of Eating Disorders, 35, 450.

Laliberté, M., Boland, F., & Leichner, P. (1999). Family climate: Family factors specifically related to disturbed eating behaviors and bulimia nervosa. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 55, 1021-1040.

Education

  • Ph.D., Queen's University, 1994

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